HIV SCANNING ELECTRON MICROGRAPH

PHIL_11279.jpg

Date

1989

Description

This scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image revealed the presence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), (spherical in appearance), which had been co-cultivated with human lymphocytes. Note the lymphocyte in the lower left, and some of its extended pseudopodia. HIV-1 virions can be seen on the surface of this lymphocyte. See PHIL 1843 for another view of this electron microscopic scenario.
A retrovirus, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was identified in 1983 as the pathogen responsible for the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). AIDS is characterized by changes in the population of T-cell lymphocytes that play a key role in the immune defense system. In the infected individual, the virus causes a depletion of T-cells, called “T-helper cells”, which leaves these patients susceptible to opportunistic infections, and certain malignancies.

Source

Public Health Image Library

Citation

CDC/ C. Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. R. McManus , “HIV SCANNING ELECTRON MICROGRAPH,” The Global Health Chronicles, accessed September 28, 2021, https://globalhealthchronicles.org/items/show/6893.